Police

Town Requests and Information

Press Release

 

For Immediate Release

Wednesday, June 24, 2015
Contact: John Guilfoil
Phone: 781-791-7627
Email: john@jgpr.net

Contact: Jessica Sacco
Phone: 978-769-5193
Email: jessica@jgpr.net

Det. James Tigges (left) and Det. Thomas Carlson (right) attended the conference on behalf of the Burlington Police Department. (Courtesy Photo)

Burlington Detectives Attend Advanced Homicide Training 

BURLINGTON — Police Chief Michael Kent is pleased to announce Detectives Thomas Carlson and James Tigges completed advanced homicide training last week.

The 22nd Annual Advanced Homicide Investigation Conference is designed to meet the needs of police tasked with the investigating homicides, suicides and unnatural deaths.

Two-hundred investigators from across the United States and Canada attended the Conference, which was co-sponsored by the New Jersey State Police and the New Jersey Homicide Investigators Association. It was held at Princeton University from June 15-19.

“Every time officers have the chance to attend and utilize outside training opportunities is a benefit for this department and the community,” Chief Kent said. “Advanced instruction in any area of law enforcement allows us to improve our skills and better protect residents.”

Throughout the week, the detectives received specialized training in the following areas:

·         Interview and interrogation techniques, including instruction on recognizing deceptive behavior

·         Police-involved shootings and performance under extreme stress

·         Wound analysis

·         Infant death investigation

·         Blood spatter analysis

·         Crime scene reconstruction

·         Leadership and decision making during homicide investigation

Attendees heard a presentation from Connecticut State Troopers who responded to and investigated the Sandy Hook shooting in Newtown, Conn.

They also visited the Sept. 11 Memorial in New York City, where they attended a presentation about the significance evidence played in both the 1993 World Trade Center bombing and the 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center, the Pentagon and Flight 93 that crashed in Shanksville, Pa.


 

 

 

Burlington Police Department

Michael R. Kent, Chief of Police

45 Center St.
Burlington, MA 01803

 

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Monday, June 8, 2015

Contact: John Guilfoil
Phone: 781-791-7627
Email: john@jgpr.net

Contact: Jessica Sacco
Phone: 978-769-5193
Email: jessica@jgpr.net

 

 

Burlington Police Department Promotes Captain Thomas Duffy to Deputy Chief 

BURLINGTON -- Police Chief Michael Kent is pleased to announce he has today appointed Captain Thomas Duffy as the Burlington Police Department's first-ever Deputy Chief.

As Deputy Chief, Duffy will provide a clear line of command and assist in the daily operations of running the department.

"I am pleased to have Captain Duffy as second in command, because he is a dedicated member of the department with decades of meritorious service," Chief Kent said. "I know he will excel in this job and assist in moving the department forward."

Duffy has spent his entire police career at the Burlington Police Department. Since 2011, he's worked as Captain, serving as the Operations Commander and the senior ranking officer when the Chief is off duty.

For almost 10 years prior to that, from 2003 to 2011, Duffy maintained his rank as lieutenant. He managed the daily operations of all three patrol shifts, served as Commander for the Northeastern Massachusetts Law Enforcement Council's School Threat Assessment and Response System (he earned the NEMLEC Exceptional Service Award in 2009) and was a liaison to the Burlington High School Emergency Response Team.

As a Sergeant, Duffy’s rank from 1991 to 2003 he served time as the Officer in Charge of the department’s Firearms Training Unit as well as the Officer in Charge of the department’s Traffic Division. Additionally as a Sergeant, Duffy became a Squad Leader as a member of the NEMLEC Tactical Police Force. In 2000, he was assigned to the NEMLEC S.T.A.R.S. Unit, which responds to incidents of school violence.

Duffy started with Burlington Police in 1985 as a patrolman. At the time, he was assigned to the traffic division as the department's first motorcycle officer. Two years later, he joined the NEMLEC Tactical Police Force while performing his other patrol duties in Burlington.

"I am excited and honored to be stepping into the role of Deputy Chief," Duffy said. "I look forward to working more closely with Chief Kent and to further strengthen department operations while continuing to keep Burlington safe for our residents."

Duffy grew up in Burlington and has lived in town for 53 years. He attended Burlington schools and was actively involved in youth and high school sports, where he participated and coached. He has three children, two daughters and one son who were also raised in Burlington and attended Burlington schools and participated in athletics as well.

TRAINING

Over the years, Duffy has completed a wide range of training courses to improve his skills. This includes graduating from the prestigious FBI National Academy, FBI Law Enforcement Executive Development Seminar and the Senior Management Institute for Police. Fewer than one percent of police officers in the country are National Academy graduates.

Duffy also completed over 2,300 hours of additional specialized training to further strengthen his administrative skills and work in the field.

Duffy holds a master's degree in criminal justice administration from Western New England College.

###

 

 

 


 

 

 

Burlington Police Department

Michael R. Kent, Chief of Police

45 Center St.
Burlington, MA 01803

 

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Monday, June 8, 2015

Contact: John Guilfoil
Phone: 781-791-7627
Email: john@jgpr.net

 

Burlington Police Welcome Two New Officers to the Department

BURLINGTON -- Police Chief Michael Kent is pleased to announce two full-time police officers will join the Burlington Police Department later this month.

Chief Kent will officially appoint Gregory Gough and Patrick Lyons, each Burlington residents, on June 8.

"We are pleased to welcome officer Gough and officer Lyons to the Burlington Police Department," Chief Kent said. "I know their training and experience in the field will be greatly beneficial to this police force. We look forward to increasing our manpower to add to the quality of service we provide residents every day."

Officer Gough comes to the department from the Farmington Police Department in New Hampshire, where he worked as a patrolman since 2012. He is the son of Michael and Donna Gough, of Burlington. He graduated from the MBTA Transit Police Academy and completed the New Hampshire Police Standards and Training Council course. Gough also holds a bachelor's degree in criminal justice with a minor in psychology from Curry College.

Since September 2014, Officer Lyons worked at the Boston University Police Department. The year prior, he was a patrolman at the Laconia Police Department in New Hampshire. He is the son of Thomas and Maureen Lyons, of Burlington. Lyons earned a bachelor's degree in criminal justice from Westfield State University. He also completed the New Hampshire Police Standards and Training Council Academy.

 ###

 

 

  SCAM ALERT

The Burlington Police Department would like to warn citizens to be aware of two phone scams that have res

urfaced in the area.  The perpetrators use the internet and social media websites to research for potential targets.

The first is known as the "Grandparent Scam," in which fraudsters are impersonating as a grandchild in distress and begging for cash.  Typically a grandparent receives a phone call or an e-mail from a "grandchild." If it is a phone call, it's usually late at night or early in the morning when most people are not thinking clearly.  Usually the person claims to be in a foreign country and has been arrested, involved in an accident or mugged and needs money as soon as possible.  The caller does not want his parents notified.  Sometimes, instead of the "grandchild" making the phone call, the criminal pretends to be an arresting officer, a lawyer, or a doctor from a hospital.  The anxious grandparent is then instructed to send money via Western Union or Money Gram.  Once the transfer is made, the grandparent often receives another call requesting more money.  Wiring money is like sending cash.  Once the money is gone, you can't trace it or get it back.  Financial losses in these cases can be substantial and usually cost the victim several thousands of dollars.

If you receive a call where someone is contacting you for money, you could resist the pressure to act quickly and try to contact the grandchild or another family member to determine whether or not the call is legitimate.  Never write money based on a request over the phone or in an e-mail.

The second is known as the "IRS Scam," in which a person, including recent immigrants, receives a call from a person claiming to be from the IRS.  The caller tells the victim they owe taxes and must paying using a pre-paid debit card or wire transfer.  The scammers threaten those who refuse to pay with arrest, deportation or loss of a business or driver's license.  The caller may know the last four digits of the victim's social security number and make caller ID appear as if the IRS is calling.  Often, a second call is made claiming to be the police, and caller ID again supports their claim.  If the caller claims to be a Burlington Police Officer, ask for their last name and call 781-272-1212 to verify the authenticity of the call. 

The IRS usually contacts people by mail-not by phone-about unpaid taxes and the IRS won't ask for payment using a pre-paid debit card or wire transfer.  The agency won't ask for a credit card number over the phone.  If you get a call from someone claiming to be with the IRS, hand up and the IRS at 1-800-829-1040.  IRS workers can help you with payment questions.  The IRS will never request personal or financial information by e-mail, texting or any social media.

The Burlington Police recommend that you never give a caller personal information, including your bank account, credit card, social security or driver's license number.  Western Union transfer forms specifically warn senders not to send money for an unconfirmed emergency related to a grandchild or other family member.  Money Gram also has a fraud warning on transfer forms and says it can put holds on transfers that raise red flags.  Additionally, limit your personal information, such as vacation plans, on shared and social media sites.

If you believe you may be a potential victim or have been victimized, call the Burlington Police at 781-272-1212. To report an online crime visit: www.IC3.gov.

PD Version: Phone Scams


Burlington Police Seek Help in Identifying Medallion from 1975 Cold Case:

Burlington Police recently sought assistance from The Poughkeepsie Journal, in Poughkeepsie, NY in order to identify a Medallion found  in 1975 Homicide Case. This case has yet to be solved and are seeking any assistance in identifying the medallion.

medallion picture

If you have any information please contact Lt. Glen Mills via phone: 781-272-1212  address: Burlington Police Department Attn: Lt. Glen Mills 45 Center St. Burlington, MA 01803 or Fax: 781-270-1920.

You can view the article online: The Poughkeepsie Journal

You can view the Press Release: Unsolved 1975 Homicide

In 2014, the Burlington Police Department was awarded a Cummings Foundation “$100K for 100” communities grant to design, build, and deploy a Mobile Command Unit (MCU) to be utilized for large scale preplanned events and during critical public safety incidents that arise in the community. This vehicle (MCU), currently being manufactured, will greatly assist the Burlington Police Department and its partnering agencies in managing such crises and events in which public safety is at issue so that the best possible outcomes may be achieved.